Posts Tagged: Science

Hummingbird’s singing feathers

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The BBC is reporting on some new research that show the characteristic chirp of the Anna’s Hummingbird is most likely made by vibrations of the tail feathers during high speed descents. It’s interesting stuff, and I’ve got to say, I’m both worried and intrigued by the statement (emphasis added): “We use high-speed video of diving birds, experimental manipulation… Read more »

USA300

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This really is the last thing we need. I’m not talking about the bug itself (although obviously MRSA is a problem and needs to be taken very seriously,) but about the fact that it seems to have established itself in the gay community. I haven’t googled to find out, but I’m sure the Religious Right has already got… Read more »

That 2.5M Sea Scopion

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By now you’ll have all noticed the stories about a newly discovered breed of giant sea scorpion, which terrorised aquatic environments 300 million years ago. The BBC and CNN have both reported on it. Sloppily. Quite aside from Kevin Z’s valid criticisms of the CNN coverage, the thing both sites have utterly failed to mention… Read more »

No ID, please: we’re British

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The UK government has issued guidelines to science teachers, detailing what they should teach about ID and other forms of creationism. The answer, thankfully, is: “pretty much nothing.” Well, except possibly to point out that it’s not science. Now all we need them to do is get rid of the faith schools, and we’ll be… Read more »

But are they born by bursting out of people’s chests?

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In what might just be the coolest piece of science news this year, it turns out that Moray Eels have two sets of jaws. A normal one, and a retractable inner one that they use for biting things that are already held in the primary mouth. Not only is this a spectacularly cool thing for… Read more »

The danger of colloquialisms

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Carl Zimmer posted an interesting article last night about historical biogeography, and the clues we can get about continental drift (amongst other things,) from the distribution of fauna. Generally smaller, less mobile, and more environmentally picky creatures are the most use, since they don’t tend to get around by other means, and this piece writes… Read more »

More on atheist and scientific epistemology

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In case I haven’t banged on about this enough over the past couple of weeks, here’s another great article explaining why atheism is the rational result of the scientific world-view. This time with pictures! I especially like this diagram; it does a great job of illustrating the scientific attitude to knowledge. Go and read the… Read more »

The Veil Nebula

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I always like Phils descriptive posts about astronomical phenomena; he has a real flair for capturing the sense of awe and grandeur that must accompany a career in watching galaxies collide, mega-volcanoes erupt, and stars explode. But this write up on the Veil Nebula really caught my eye, Why? Well, look at those dates; that… Read more »